12 hours ago with 54,514 notes — via tishytash, © king-funky-fried



13 hours ago with 120,762 notes — via oh-ck-dexter-haaaven, © buckybarnesque



And even more amazing was the day she realized she truly loved him back.

13 hours ago with 2,724 notes — via brienneoftarth, © lady-arryn



Jessica Williams talks to John Tamny, columnist for Forbes

13 hours ago with 157,042 notes — via oh-ck-dexter-haaaven, © sandandglass






The first film she actually chose, she says, was The Jacket in 2005, and the second was Pride & Prejudice later that year - the kind of character-driven, smaller-budget parts she’s specialised in ever since. For both, the directors - John Maybury and Joe Wright, respectively - wanted nothing at all to do with her at first.

"Nope. Neither wanted to work with me. I really had to fight just to get both those meetings, because they both wanted different people for the roles. John Maybury was like, ‘I think you’re wrong for this. I don’t want you. I don’t think you can act,’"

Wow. Wasn’t she upset by that?

"No, because it was pretty much what everyone was saying, so I actually appreciated the fact that he said it to my face. So I said, if I read for you right now and if you think it’s good, you have to give me the part right now. If you think it’s shit, you don’t have to say anything, you just have to leave." She auditioned, he got up to leave, and at the very last moment he turned around and said, "OK, see you in three months." He would go on to direct her again in 2008’s The Edge of Love."It was a proper Hollywood moment!"

- Keira Knightley in British GQ, March 2012

13 hours ago with 150 notes — via halfagony-halfhope, © whedonology



"You can’t call anybody anymore. If you call someone, they’re like, ‘What?! Are you on fire? Then quit wasting my time, text me that shit!’"
— Aziz Ansari (via mybrilliantsanity)



alinedraws:

Reading is always charming.

alinedraws:

Reading is always charming.

2 days ago with 701 notes — via halfagony-halfhope, © alinedraws









femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
As Bonhams will tell you, “The second half of the nineteenth-century saw a renewed interest in the social and artistic history of the previous century[, and]…a general curiosity and fascination for the refined taste and decadent lifestyle of the nobility under the Ancien Regime.”
Francesco Beda’s The Art Lesson tends towards the quieter end of the genre.
A man in a champagne suit advises a woman in a complimentary shade of ivory on her decorative vase painting.
Surrounded as they may be with all the swirls and frills of Beda’s imagined world, the two focus pensively on the task at hand.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

As Bonhams will tell you, “The second half of the nineteenth-century saw a renewed interest in the social and artistic history of the previous century[, and]…a general curiosity and fascination for the refined taste and decadent lifestyle of the nobility under the Ancien Regime.”

Francesco Beda’s The Art Lesson tends towards the quieter end of the genre.

A man in a champagne suit advises a woman in a complimentary shade of ivory on her decorative vase painting.

Surrounded as they may be with all the swirls and frills of Beda’s imagined world, the two focus pensively on the task at hand.

2 days ago with 194 notes — via cleopatro, © femme-de-lettres
#art






2 days ago with 412 notes — via teacoffeebooks, © bookscoffeeandtea



juliansballclenchingfalsetto:

*debates whether to buy something* *imagines aziz ansari saying “treat yo self”* *treats self*

2 days ago with 86,155 notes — via lyxdelsic, © juliansballclenchingfalsetto